Megatrend of Demographics

Evaluate the megatrend of demographics in the IT field. Give your opinion as to why IT managers must understand this megatrend when selecting talent for organizational positions. According to the lesson, the changes in the economy, communicating and doing business with countries other than the US, will have impact on the selection of employees for organizational positions. An IT manager may need someone that understands the IT business language of a particular countcy that could become a potential buisness partner or vendor. Having the right person for the right position will contribute to the overall success of the business (Cortada, 2009). There’s a subtrend of talented, well-educated people with IT skills that are roving the world
Speculate as to why the megatrend of demographics may impact the . development of IT products worldwide, especially in countries with aging populations. Supply and demand tends to drive the needs or wants of humans. There are a lot of developing countries that are desperate need of IT products. As a comparison to the rest of the world, some of those countries fall way behind in technology. If those developing countries can’t afford these IT opportunities, or the infrastructure isn’t there for businesses, they will have to either do without or depend on financial aid to assist them. According to the lesson on page 12, technology affects the role, work, and quality of life of people. Additionally, the megatrend of changing demographics that need to be recognized specifically involved the ages of the population. Work forces and populations are aging rapidly in some countries. As people get older, the demand for IT-based medicine and procedure technology will increase. Countries will have a great demand for this type of technology.

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While it is understood that the CIO should set the example for the IT organization, determine the top three things that the head of IT should be doing to improve the skills of the IT staff. I have been in many IT environments in which there was little opportunity for skill improvement for employees without them actively seeking it outside of the organization, which rarely benefits the organization or IT group. Promoting skills development is often less costly than the potential financial implications, reputation issues and reduced support capabilities of losing the knowledge and expertise of a system when someone resigns or is terminated, especially if they are the “keeper of all knowledge” of system or process. Develop and maintain an effective training program: Though on-the-job training has its own set of benefits, a training plan that promotes focused and strategic training for technologies and skills that one may not easily be able to easily obtain on-the-job can significantly improve the skill set of individual IT members. Create paths and opportunities for promotion and role changes: Allowing employees to change job roles or having a path to promotion not only can improve skills of the IT staff, but improve morality and staff retention. Encourage an IT culture of mentorship and knowledge sharing: Promoting an IT culture in which IT members readily mentor other members and effectively transfer knowledge to peers is the most cost-effective way to improve skills, while also ensuring that no single person is the “keeper of all knowledge” of a specific technology, process or implementation. While there can be hurdles for these items- budget, IT organizational acceptance, and resource utilization concerns- the payoff can very well exceed them.
Having staff with the proper skill sets is immensely important to accomplishing corporate objectives. List and support three best practices in staffing future organizational needs. Look for versatility: When many organizations look for a specific skill set and experience history directly related to an open position, seeking out those that have more than a small or specific discipline can have excellent long-term benefits. When I hire new staff as a network engineer, I want to know that they have extensive knowledge of different operating systems, especially features relating to network protocol stacks and the certain nuances of the OS as it relates to networking. Ensure skill sets and experiences are real-world: Sometimes, a manager may be looking for someone with a collection of skill sets, but focus on a candidate who, while they have extensive experience in some of the skill sets, have only practical experience with others. They are hired with the assumption that they can pick them up, which often proves to make them less effective of an IT staff member if the missing skill sets were not needed for their job role. Ensure previous experience shows motivation: While finding a candidate in which the majority of their career has been in a certain discipline, finding one that started out at a lower level and worked their way into higher, more complex disciplines shows that they have motivation to learn, grow and move up. For example, my career started as developing assembly code for embedded applications, then moved to configuring small servers and networking equipment for computercontrolled commercial audio systems for airports and stadiums, I continued to move on to desktop support, then systems administration, to network operations, to a network analyst, to a network engineer, to a mixed position consisting of DBA, network engineering, systems administration and security functions. Eventually, I moved on to being the Manager of lnfoSec, then Sr. Manager over Network and lnfoSec, then to a Director level. Every piece of my previous experiences put me in the perfect position to provide ideas to other groups in the company when it comes to design, implementation, support and problem resolution for not only my teams, but for desktop support, network operations, change management, DBA and development groups.

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